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    What’s so funny about this? You’ve got to admit Steven Wright has a bizarre yet very clever mind. He pays very close attention to...
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    What’s so funny about this? We’re WAY overdue for a limerick. So I’m bringing you a classic one with an opening line that’s been used in...
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    What’s so funny about this? This joke is based on an old biblical saying from the book of Matthew. The original saying is : The spirit...
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    This joke came from, British comedian, Jimmy Carr #ESL #ELT #ELL #ELD #ESOL #EFL #TESOL #ESOL #English #language #twinglish #joke...
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    This joke comes from the philosopher, Ted Cohen #ESL #ELT #ELL #ELD #ESOL #EFL #TESOL #ESOL #English #language #twinglish #joke...
    • Whatsofunny WHAT DO ALEXANDER THE GREAT AND WINNIE THE POOH HAVE IN COMMON? – THEY HAVE THE SAME MIDDLE NAME. What’s so funny about this? Once again the set-up sets us up to be completely faked out. We rack our brains trying to figure out what these two characters could possibly have in common. That’s because we are focused on the characteristics and personalities of these guys. Of course, that also assumes that we know who both are them actually are or were, and that we’ve read or heard enough about their stories and backgrounds to find things they might hold in common. Even so, it would be a daunting or difficult task. Alexander was a real historical person. He was a Greek, actually a Macedonian, king who had a very strong army and several thousand years ago, he defeated the Persians who at that time had the strongest army in the known world. Alexander went on to conquer many countries in the Middle East and Africa and established his own empire. Winnie the Pooh, on the other hand, is a cartoon bear, an illustration that went with A.A. Milne’s classic children’s story. In fact it’s difficult for me to think of Winnie without picturing what he looks like. Winnie is a bear who lives in a forest, has lots of friends and loves honey. So what DO Winnie and Alex have in common? It turns out that I don’t need any prior knowledge to answer the question. In fact, the answer to the question is in the actual question. Alex’s full title is Alexander the Great. This kind of description is common when talking about important kings and queens. Other examples are Catherine the Great, Ivan the Terrible, and even Vlad the Impalor. You take the name of the ruler and add a distinguishing characteristic. You can figure out for yourself what kind of people Catherine, Ivan and Vlad were, and what people thought of them. Winnie is different in that he never was king of the forest or any other place. Nevertheless, it is also common when talking about animals by their names to use their personal names along with their animal names, such as Harry the Horse or Tom the Turtle. But Milne called Winnie the Pooh for the same reason Alex was called great. When Winnie was bothered by flies around his nose, he would try to blow them away with a puff of air, which sounded like “Pooh”. That’s how he became known as Winnie the Pooh. I know, too much information. All we really need is to see that both Alex and Winnie have the word “the” in their titles. And THAT’s what’s so funny!
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    What’s so funny about this? While there are many possible answers to the question of what is different between a magician and a...
    dpsjohnson likes this.
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    I SAW A COMMERCIAL ON LATE NIGHT TV; IT SAID, “FORGET EVERYTHING YOU KNOW ABOUT SLIPCOVERS." SO I DID. AND IT WAS A LOAD OFF MY MIND....
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    What’s so funny about this? This particular joke is a little tricky because of the differences in spelling between British and American...
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    I have a great dog who’s named Scooter Renowned as a garbage can looter An apple pie moochie, Yep, he’s my poochie, He has no other...
    BeesKnees likes this.
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    TWO VULTURES BOARD AN AIRPLANE, EACH CARRYING TWO DEAD RACCOONS. THE STEWARDESS LOOKS AT THEM AND SAYS, "I'M SORRY, GENTLEMEN, ONLY ONE...
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    AN OCTOPUS IS CREEPY. I MAKE NO BONES ABOUT IT. What’s so funny about this? You might or might not laugh at this whether or not you...
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    What’s so funny about this? Here is another classic, “man walks into a bar…” joke. If you’re from a different part of the English...
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    IF A SEAGULL FLIES OVER THE SEA, WHAT FLIES OVER A BAY? What’s so funny about this? This is kind of an obvious riddle, so instead of...
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    THE INSURANCE WAS INVALID FOR THE INVALID. What’s so funny about this? I-n-v-a-l-i-d is a fascinating word. It’s both a homograph and...
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    HOW CAN SLIM CHANCE AND FAT CHANCE MEAN THE SAME THING? What’s so funny about this? This is one of the more popular questions about...
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    What’s so funny about this? Keep in mind that this is a joke. It’s not a treatise on religion. Nevertheless, religion and God’s existence...
    BeesKnees likes this.
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    MARY GAVE THE CHILD THE DOG BIT A BAND AID. What’s so funny about this? Oh yeah, we’re headed down the garden path again. We haven’t...
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    WHEN FISH ARE IN SCHOOLS THEY SOMETIMES TAKE DEBATE What’s so funny about this? There is nothing fishy about this joke. You just need...
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    • Whatsofunny This joke came from @aoedemuse Aoede/Lisa Sniderman on Twitter.com
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    • Whatsofunny SHE TOLD ME MY NEW CELLPHONE LOOKED SWEET SO SHE BIT MY HONEY PHONE. WHEN I TRIED TO STOP HER SHE HIT MY FUNNY BONE What’s so funny about this? Three-word or more spoonerisms are hard to find or create. I was lucky to come up with this one. It is a bit of a stretch, meaning you have to stretch your imagination and language knowledge to understand it, but I think it does work. The set-up is pretty easy and straight forward. Two people are talking about their new cell phones. This is a common conversation topic these days, because people constantly seem to be upgrading their existing phones, that is, getting new, improved models. Cell phone manufacturers are always trying to get an edge on the competition and come up with something new and unique. In this joke the new cell phone appears to be sweet and honey flavored. At first, we might think that the woman was only using a metaphor when she described the cellphone as sweet. In this sense it just means nice looking, perhaps easy to use. But in the next sentence we learn that the phone was literally sweet because it was coated with honey, which is why she bit it. But the guy did not appreciate this. He didn’t want someone putting their saliva on his new sweet cellphone, nor did he want her to actually remove some of phone with her teeth. But, maybe she studies aikido or some other martial art, because she really wanted to eat this phone. So much so, that when the guy tried to stop her, she used her skills to hit him on his funny bone. This 2-word phrase refers to a part of your elbow. It’s not really a bone but a nerve ending called the ulna nerve. When someone hits the nerve and it rubs up against a bone in your arm called the humerus, spelled h-u-m-e-r-u-s, it produces a strange buzzing sensation. It doesn’t tickle and it’s not funny. If you smash it hard enough it will hurt. It’s called the funny bone because of its proximity, or nearness to the humerus bone which is a homonym of humorous, h-u-m-o-r-o-u-s, meaning funny. And that’s why you can spoonerize BIT MY HONEY PHONE to HIT MY FUNNY BONE. And THAT’s futzo wunny, I mean what’s so funny.