Istanbul & BREXIT. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs.

Jun 29, 2016, 04:08 AM

06-28-2016 (Photo: Turkish Airlines maintains its hub at Istanbul Atatürk Airport) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules http://johnbatchelorshow.com/blog Twitter: @BatchelorShow

Istanbul & BREXIT. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs.

“We urge the world, especially Western countries, to take a firm stand against terrorism,” Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said. “Despite paying a heavy price, Turkey has the power, determination, and capacity to continue the fight against terrorism until the end.” The attack on the airport “should serve as a turning point in the fight against terrorism around the world, and especially in Western countries,” he said. Outside the airport, stranded passengers hauled their luggage as they were evacuated from the terminal. Some travelers cried and embraced one another. One woman stood outside with a sign bearing the name of a missing passenger. Ambulances raced in and out of the area, sirens wailing. https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/explosions-hit-istanbuls-airport-official-says/2016/06/28/a5cedca6-3d65-11e6-9e16-4cf01a41decbstory.html?hpid=hphp-top-table-main_no-name%3Ahomepage%2Fstory

The Urban-Regions War Has Begun, As Predicted Analysis. By Gregory R. Copley, Editor, GIS/Defense & Foreign Affairs. The United Kingdom’s Brexit decision — at least the electorate’s decision — to quit the European Union marked the first major reversal of the dominance of urban capitals over their hinterland regions in the post-Cold War era. But, given the continuing lure of urbanization and the current insistence on voter numbers as the sole measure of democracy, was it a last hurrah for the countryside?
Or was it a sign that the regions would no longer accept the tyranny of the marginal majority — as the current iteration of democracy has become — and therefore the start of a resurgence of a more Westphalian version of democracy, one which balanced territory with population? Urban voting concentrations — or the urban political élites in most countries — have, for the past decade or more, been attempting to eradicate the institutions designed to give weight to geographic dispersal or citizens. The geographic representation given by the UK’s House of Lords (until Labor Prime Minister Tony Blair’s destruction of the spirit of that House); the gradual politicization of the Senates of the US, Australia, France, Nigeria, and the like, have all been vitiated by a gradual removal of these bodies’ original intent to represent rural or geographic interests of a nation-state.
The result has been a rapid accretion of power into the hands of the urban mass which has then comfortably disregarded the regions.
This writer forecast the revolt of the regions in the 2012 book, UnCivilization: Urban Geopolitics in a Time of Chaos, noting: “In the current wave of cultural realignments, confederacies such as the European Union may enjoy a breathing space if they resist the urge toward unified policy and centralized power, but the EU seems bent on having all the powers of an Empire, with none of the responsibilities. Ultimately, a further battle between urban and non-urban societies may be played out in Europe.” Clearly, in the ensuing years from 2012, the EU did not resist the urge toward greater power, and remained blind to the anger of the regions….”