Preliminary Analysis of ExoMars 2016 Schiaparelli Crash-landing on Mars Meridiani Planum. Juno Safe Mode. Bob Zimmerman, BehindtheBlack.

Oct 21, 2016, 04:12 AM

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Preliminary Analysis of ExoMars 2016 Schiaparelli Crash-landing on Mars Meridiani Planum. Juno Safe Mode. Bob Zimmerman, BehindtheBlack.

“Schiaparelli landing apparently a failure October 20, 2016 at 8:32 am Robert Zimmerman This report from russianspaceweb.com provides some details about the apparent landing failure of the European Mars probe Schiaparelli on Wednesday. The very preliminary analysis of the data revealed a number of serious problems in the final phase of the parachute descent. The telemetry showed that the back heat shield holding the parachute had been ejected earlier than scheduled — 50 seconds instead of 30 seconds before the touchdown. Also, the lander was apparently descending at a speed higher than planned. There were also indications that the soft-landing engines had fired for only three or four seconds and all communications from the lander were cut 19 seconds later, or shortly before touchdown. By that time, Schiaparelli’s landing radar had been activated. It appears the parachutes were released too soon so that they did not function properly and slow the spacecraft down enough. When the retro-rockets fired the spacecraft was probably also closer to the ground than planned and falling too fast, so they failed to stop it from impacting the surface hard and prematurely.”

http://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/schiaparelli-landing-apparently-a-failure/


Fortunately for the ESA engineering team, the TGO orbiter recorded up to 600 megabytes of data from the Schiaparelli's entry into the Martian atmosphere and its descent to the surface. All this information was successfully downlinked on the ground in the early hours of October 20. The very preliminary analysis of the data revealed a number of serious problems in the final phase of the parachute descent. The telemetry showed that the back heat shield holding the parachute had been ejected earlier than scheduled -- 50 seconds instead of 30 seconds before the touchdown. (Other sources said the parachute had separated 15 seconds prematurely). Also, the lander was apparently descending at a speed higher than planned. There were also indications that the soft-landing engines had fired for only three or four seconds and all communications from the lander were cut 19 seconds later, or shortly before touchdown. By that time, Schiaparelli's landing radar had been activated. Less than 24 hours after the botched landing, ESA engineers expressed confidence that they had received enough data to find out exactly what happened, but it would take some time to sift through all the information and interpret the findings. As a result, even in failure, the lander still provided much of the engineering data sought from the mission. There was also early hope that measurements from onboard engineering sensors collected by the AMELIA payload during the entry and descent could also be recovered. ESA promised to continue attempts to communicate with the lander in the coming days using available orbiters and to make an effort to locate the lander or its remnants on the surface of Mars

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/exomars2016-edm-landing.html#failure

http://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/juno-enters-safe-mode-prior-to-jupiter-close-approach/