Trump’s Mattis & Flynn to Go On Offense. Iran Fears Strength. Russia Respects Strength. @SebGorka

Jan 13, 2017, 05:03 AM

01-12-2017 (Photo: U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and U.S. Marine Gen. Gen. James N. Mattis, commander, U.S. Central Command, salute during the presentation of colors at the change-of-command ceremony for U.S. Forces Iraq in Baghdad, Sept. 1, 2010. U.S. Army Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III relieved U.S. Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno. DoD photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley ) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules http://johnbatchelorshow.com/blog Twitter: @BatchelorShow

Trump’s Mattis & Flynn to Go On Offense. Iran Fears Strength. Russia Respects Strength. @SebGorka

Iraq General Mattis did not say how many American troops should be kept in Iraq, but he asserted that the United States needed to maintain its influence there long after Mosul was captured from the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL. “Our principal interest in Iraq is to ensure that it does not become a rump state of the regime in Tehran,” he wrote. “It will be essential to fold any efforts in Iraq following ISIS’s defeat in Mosul into an integrated regional strategy.” Syria General Mattis did not offer a solution for the conflict in Syria, which has killed hundreds of thousands. But he described the fighting as a major threat to American national security interests, offering a more alarming view of the crisis than the Obama administration and, at times, than Mr. Trump. “The brutal civil war in Syria has destabilized the Middle East, contributed to the destabilization of Europe and threatened allies like Israel, Jordan and Turkey, all while ISIS, Iran and Russia have profited from the chaos — none of which has been in America’s national interest,” he wrote. Russia General Mattis said he supported Mr. Trump’s “desire to engage” with Russia, but he provided a vivid catalog of the potential dangers. “Challenges posed by Russia include alarming messages from Moscow regarding the use of nuclear weapons; treaty violations; the use of hybrid warfare tactics to destabilize other countries; and involvement in hacking and information warfare,” he wrote. NATO There was nothing in General Mattis’s responses that would make American support for NATO conditional on financial contributions of its members, as Mr. Trump has suggested. He said the alliance “enormously” benefits American security. “The alliance must harness renewed political will to confront and walk back aggressive Russian actions,” said General Mattis, who added that it was also important for NATO members to meet their military spending goals. Cuba General Mattis said he opposed military exchanges or security cooperation with Raúl Castro’s Cuba. Afghanistan General Mattis did not say what American troop levels should be in Afghanistan, but he indicated that he saw the country as important to American interests. “We all remember what it felt like on 9/11 and 9/12,” he wrote. “We should do what is necessary to prevent such an attack from occurring again.” Iran While the Obama administration has held out hope for better relations with Tehran, General Mattis said he saw Iran as an increasing threat. “Iranian malign influence in the region is growing,” he wrote. Terrorism Mr. Trump said during the campaign that it might be necessary to “take out” terrorists’ families to win the war against the Islamic State. General Mattis categorically opposes such an approach. “The killing of noncombatants in a war against a nonstate enemy violates Common Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions,” he wrote. “Legal questions aside, it is my view that such actions would be self-defeating and a betrayal of our ideals.” https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/12/us/politics/james-mattis-defense-secretary-nominee.html?_r=0