Generational divide in troubled South Korea. @EthanEpstiiIine

Apr 06, 2017, 04:03 AM

04-06-2017 (Photo:Seoul, protesting President Park ) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules http://johnbatchelorshow.com/blog Twitter: @BatchelorShow

Generational divide in troubled South Korea. @EthanEpstiiIine

South Korea has been officially president-less since December 9, when the National Assembly voted for Park's impeachment. She was immediately suspended from office​—​though allowed to remain in the Blue House​—​while the Constitutional Court deliberated whether to accept the National Assembly's decision. (The country's prime minister assumed presidential duties following Park's impeachment, though, appropriately, he has treated this largely as a caretaker role.) In early March, the unanimous decision came down: Park was out. A new president will be elected May 9.

Park needed to go, but South Koreans sure picked an awfully inconvenient time to not have a president. As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump delighted in bashing South Korea, claiming that the close U.S. ally doesn't pay enough for the presence of U.S. forces in the country. (Though the numbers have fallen slightly, more than 28,000 U.S. servicemen are still stationed here, guarding against North Korean invasion.) Trump also bemoaned South Korea's industrial policies, lamenting, for example, that Korea has become a powerhouse for television manufacturing, a business that all but dried up in the United States a generation ago...."

http://www.weeklystandard.com/troubled-seoul/article/2007448