90 percent of North Korea trade is China. @ _AnthonyRuggeiro @fdd @elalusa Report w/Malcolm Hoenlein @conf_of_pres.

08-10-2017

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90 percent of North Korea trade is China. @ _AnthonyRuggeiro @fdd @elalusa Report w/Malcolm Hoenlein @conf_of_pres.

Coming after Pyongyang's two intercontinental ballistic missile tests in July, and days before as Trump promised to meet any North Korean threats with “fire and fury,” “the new U.N. resolution provides the framework for stringent sanctions, but in and of itself, it doesn't impose any economic pressure,” said Edward Fishman, a State Department official who worked on U.S. sanctions policy in the Obama administration. “The key will be whether countries like China and Russia actually enforce this U.N. resolution.”

90 percent of North's trade is with China

Anthony Ruggiero, who worked on sanctions at the Treasury Department and is now with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, told VOA Korean that much depends on how effectively China enforces the sanctions, particularly those aimed at “reining in the activities of Chinese companies who have collaborated with North Korea and North Korean brokers in China.” According to South Korean statistics, China accounts for an average of 90 percent of total trade with North Korea.

“Over the last 11 years, we have not seen the level of sanctions necessary, and we know that non-North Koreans are facilitating North Korea's sanctions evasion,” said Ruggiero, who regretted that U.N. sanctions are focusing primarily on the North Koreans.

The resolution added nine people to the U.N. blacklist. All of them are now subject to a global asset freeze and travel ban. All are North Koreans, four in Russia and five in China, who are either officials or representatives of companies and banks, said Ruggiero.

“If we want to know why U.N. sanctions are not working, it's because North Korea is able to operate inside China and Russia,” he said. “What (China and Russia) are going to have to do is, they are going to have to stop their nationals and entities and banks from facilitating North Korea's sanctions evasion.”

Another critic of the new measures, Larry Niksch, a former Asia expert at the U.S. Congressional Research Service, said China's enforcement of other sanctions has been “spotty at best.” He pointed out the continued existence of “informal, unreported smuggling” across China's border with North Korea, and added, "so the actual reduction in exports is going to be, it seems to me, far less than $1 billion, and that will not hurt the regime in any severe way at all.”

http://www.defenddemocracy.org/media-hit/anthony-ruggiero-will-new-sanctions-restrain-kim-jong-un-maybe-not/

http://www.defenddemocracy.org/media-hit/anthony-ruggiero-how-north-korea-cheats-sanctions/

http://www.defenddemocracy.org/media-hit/anthony-ruggiero-how-americas-friends-aid-north-koreas-missile-program/

Aug 11, 07:01 AM
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