No bargaining table for North Korea. @crosett @gordongchang

C

09-13-2017

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No bargaining table for North Korea. @crosett @gordongchang

Which brings us to the second big problem with these UN resolutions. They all aim, quite explicitly, to bring North Korea back to the bargaining table. This is an idea all too prevalent in Washington as well. In testimony on North Korea to the Senate Banking Committee last week, former Acting Secretary of the Treasury Adam Szubin summed it up, saying that sanctions "are meant to incentivize behavioral change."

Dream on. If North Korea's regime does come to the bargaining table, that might look like a change in behavior. But everything in the record by now should be telling us that North Korea won't be coming to relinquish its nuclear missile program. It will be coming to cash in, again, on the illusions of American diplomats. It will be coming to cash in, yet again, on the blinkered expertise of a host of former U.S. officials now treated as sages of North Korea policy because they were intimately involved in nuclear deals... that failed.

Those bargains, and attempted bargains, stretching back to 1994, helped pave the way to the current crisis of nuclear bombs and intercontinental ballistic missiles in the hands of a totalitarian North Korean regime that threatens and mocks the U.S., aspires to subjugate South Korea, is pushing East Asia toward a nuclear arms race, and doubles as a rogue munitions merchant to the world's worst predators.

On paper, Resolution 2375 might sound like a formula for success, or at least a good move in that direction. Slather more sanctions -- the toughest yet! -- on North Korea, and hope it leads to a deal. There will now be a new round of Washington conferences, and Op-eds, and reports, and testimony, dissecting and embellishing on the latest sanctions and, when these toughest-ever sanctions turn out to be inadequate to stop Kim's nuclear projects, recommending yet more sanctions. In Washington, it's become an industry unto itself -- expanding in tandem with North Korea's flourishing nuclear program.

Unless the real mission behind these sanctions is to help achieve the only real remedy -- which is to take down the Pyongyang regime (not bargain with it) -- then beware

https://pjmedia.com/claudiarosett/un-passes-mega-ultra-jumbo-toughest-ever-north-korea-sanctions/

Sep 14, 04:06 AM
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