Houston energy roars back from Harvey. Bud Weinstein Maguire Energy @SMUCox

Sep 19, 2017, 03:49 AM

09-18-2017 (Photo: The Buffalo Bayou portion of the Houston Ship Channel) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules Twitter: @BatchelorShow

Houston energy roars back from Harvey. Bud Weinstein Maguire Energy @SMUCox

Already, the oil and gas industry is on the rebound. Days before Hurricane Harvey made landfall, oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico were shut down. Now most of them are back on stream. As a precaution, all 20 refineries along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast, representing 25% of national capacity, were temporarily taken offline during Harvey. But within days of the storm's passing, 14 of the 20 were operating between 50% and 100% of capacity while the other six should be rebooted and fully operational by the end of this month. Import and export terminals in the Ports of Corpus Christi and Houston are also back in business. Similarly, the huge Colonial Pipeline that runs from Houston to Linden, New Jersey, and supplies gasoline and other refined products to more than a dozen states, was only out of service for a few days, ensuring that fuel shortages in the northeast and southeast are unlikely to occur. Yes, about a half-million gallons of gasoline leaked from a dozen storage tanks in Houston, but these spills were along the ship channel far away from the city's fresh water supply. Keep in mind that there are more than 4,500 storage tanks in the Houston area. So 99.7% of Houston's storage tanks didn't rupture. By contrast, Hurricane Katrina littered the coast with tens of thousands of drums, storage tanks, and other containers holding oil, chemicals, and other hazardous materials. This didn't happen with Harvey.

http://www.investors.com/politics/commentary/two-cheers-for-americas-energy-infrastructure/