Ryanair's UK deadline and September losses for African shares

Sep 29, 2017, 12:20 PM

Presenter: Russell Padmore:

This is Business Update from the BBC.......

Hello I'm Russell Padmore and these are the main headlines...

The UK orders Europe's biggest airline, Ryanair to be more transparent on compensation for cancelled flights by the end of today.....

Investors suffered big losses on investments in Africa this month......

And a setback for South Africa's tourism industry after robbers held up a bus with dozens of Dutch visitors...

The British Civil Aviation Authority has told Ryanair it must clearly tell passengers how to get compensation and what alternative flights it will offer, even with rival airlines, by the end of Friday.

The Irish budget airline, which carries more passengers than any other in Europe, has cancelled thousands of flights for the next few months, because of a shortage of pilots.

Seth Kaplan, the manager of Commercial Aviation Magazine, says it's a setback for the company's efforts to attract people travelling on business...

Foreign investors may divert their funds to emerging economies outside Africa, after shares across the continent suffered major losses this month.

A combination of political instability and falling prices of commodities like copper, led to shares and currencies, like Zambia's Kwacha, suffering big losses.

In September trading Kenya's stockmarket suffered the biggest fall in Africa, with shares in Nairobi dropping nearly nine percent and the financial market in Kampala was the second worst, with Uganda's all share index down more than five percent.

John Ashbourne follows economic developments in Africa for Capital Economics.....

A group of 36 tourists is back in the Netherlands after being robbed at gunpoint, within hours of arriving in South Africa......

They were victims of robbers while travelling by bus from Johannesburg's main airport to their hotel.

The incident is an embarrassment for South Africa, which is keen to promote itself as a tourist destination, despite the high crime rate.....

Marisa Gerards, the Dutch Ambassador in South Africa, says the tourists cut their visit short because all their belongings were stolen.

South Africa's High Court has ruled that it cannot compel President Jacob Zuma to establish a commission of inquiry into claims his government was open to influence from rich people.

The opposition Democratic Alliance asked the court to force him to investigate allegations that the billionaire Gupta business family had influenced the appointment of ministers.

Mister Zuma argued that the Public Prosecutor had no say, because this was the president's prerogative.

President Zuma and the Guptas deny the allegations....

The UK has ambitions to run as smooth a border with the European Union, as possible following Brexit, without long queues of trucks waiting for customs checks.

There is especially a big challenge on how to operate the only land border the British have with an EU nation, the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland......

There may be an example the British could copy......Norway, which isn't an EU member, has a thousand mile long border with Sweden........The Norwegians claim that a mix of technology and cooperation with their neighbours makes it the smoothest border operation in the world.

The BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones has been to see how it works.....