California’s 39% Latino vote vs the San Francisco nomenklatura. @JeffBliss1 @MarcosBreton

Nov 11, 2017, 05:15 AM

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California’s 39% Latino vote vs the San Francisco nomenklatura. @JeffBliss1 @MarcosBreton

I’m a 54-year-old son of Mexican immigrants and a journalist for more than 30 years in California. This story is personal to me because I’ve been covering it my entire career. The dynamic has barely changed. It outlived my parents, who were both American citizens and active voters before they died. I’m afraid it’s going to outlive me. I’m afraid there always will be politicians who win by vilifying us on the way to the most powerful offices in the country. So the question becomes: Should we continue to support U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, a super-rich Bay Area political icon, despite the fact that this narrative hasn’t budged in the quarter century she served in the U.S. capitol? Are we supposed to believe that Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, the wealthy former mayor of San Francisco, is going to change this narrative while running for governor of California? He’s long supported marriage equality, and that’s great. He’s touted as a real “progressive” and that’s great. But his campaign has given little indication that he could be the change agent needed to activate disenfranchised communities. Forgive me, but I don’t believe in fairy tales. For all the self-congratulatory proclamations of California as a progressive haven, the state is not as cool as it thinks it is. The traditional paths to power in California have been closely guarded by a Bay Area pecking order heretofore off-limits to Latino candidates. Feinstein, Barbara Boxer and Jerry Brown, all Bay Area political icons, have ruled the roost in California for decades. Then Kamala Harris, the former San Francisco district attorney and state attorney general, was anointed to replace Boxer in the U.S. Senate. Remember when Willie Brown, former Assembly speaker and San Francisco mayor, warned that Antonio Villaraigosa – the former Los Angeles mayor – should not challenge Harris when Boxer’s Senate seat came open?

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/marcos-breton/article182660766.html#storylink=cpy