Grant by Ron Chernow. PART 2 of 3.

Dec 06, 05:07 AM
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AUTHOR.

(Photo: English: "Admiral Porter's Fleet Running the Rebel Blockade of the Mississippi at Vicksburg, April 16th 1863."

Colored lithograph published by Currier & Ives, New York, 1863. Ships depicted are (from the front to the rear, all USS except as noted)): Benton (Flagship); Lafayette with General Price alongside; Louisville; Mound City; Pittsburg; Carondelet; transports Silver Wave, Forest Queen & Henry Clay; and Tuscumbia.

Text under the print's title reads: "At half past ten P.M. the boats left their moorings & steamed down the river, the Benton, Admiral Porter, taking the lead -- as they approached the point opposite the town, a terrible concentrated fire of the centre, upper and lower batteries, both water and bluff, was directed upon the channel, which here ran within one hundred yards of the shore. At the same moment innumerable floats of turpentine and other combustible materials were set ablaze. In the face of all this fire, the boats made their way with but little loss except the transport Henry Clay which was set on fire & sunk."

Date 1863

Source http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/h76000/h76557kl.htm Courtesy of the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Beverley R. Robinson Collection. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph - Photo #: NH 76557-KN (Color))

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Grant by Ron Chernow. PART 2 of 3.

“Grant is vast and panoramic in ways that history buffs will love. Books of its caliber by writers of Chernow’s stature are rare, and this one qualifies as a major event…. Chernow is clearly out to find undiscovered nobility in his story, and he succeeds; he also finds uncannily prescient tragedy. There are ways in which Grant’s times eerily resemble our own…Indispensable.”— The New York Times

“Chernow tells all this rapidly and well; his talent is suited to Grant’s story… He is extraordinarily good on what could be called, unpejoratively, the Higher Gossip of History—he can uncannily detect the actual meaning beneath social interactions… Fluent and intelligent.” —Adam Gopnik, New Yorker

“Marvelous…. Chernow’s biography gives us a deep look into this complicated but straightforward man, and into a troubled time in our history that still echoes today.” – Thomas E. Ricks, Foreign Policy

“Chernow rewards the reader with considerable life-and-times background, clear-eyed perspective, sympathy that stops short of sycophancy, and gritty and intimate details.” —The Boston Globe

“Arriving at a moment when excitable individuals and hysterical mobs are demonstrating crudeness in assessing historical figures, Chernow’s book is a tutorial on measured, mature judgment…. Chernow’s ‘Grant’ is a gift to a nation much in need of measured judgments about its past.” —George Will, The Washington Post

“Chernow’s Grant is as relevant a modern figure as his Hamilton. His Grant is a reminder that the very best American leaders can be, and should be, self-made, hard-working, modest for themselves and ambitious for their nation, future-looking, tolerant, and with a heart for the poor ....Chernow turns the life of yet another misunderstood figure from U.S. currency into narrative gold.”—Slate

“Eminently readable but thick with import... Grant hits like a Mack truck of knowledge.”—Ta-Nehisi Coates, The Atlantic

“Ron Chernow’s biography reminds our 21st-century selves of the distinction between character and personality” — National Review

“Chernow’s special gift is to present a complete and compelling picture of his subjects. His biographies do not offer up marble deities on a pedestal; he gives us flesh and blood human beings and helps us understand what made them tick. Just as he did with George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, Chernow brings Ulysses S. Grant to life. At the end of the book, the reader feels as if he knows the man…. A magnificent book… ….This is richly reward...

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