Best of 2017: The Great Migration to New York City. PART 2 of 2. @AnnieCorreal @NYT

Dec 25, 2017, 01:00 AM

Best of JBS. (Photo: "Just before the last of these vehicles was banished from the streets of New York City, the photographer snapped one of them as it passed alongside a 'Modern Electric Car' powered by the conduit between the rails. This photo was shot on Broadway just north of the intersection with Broome Street. The car is headed southbound." Photo, looking north, shows horse-drawn and electric trams side by side. Date 1917 Source w:The New York Times photo archive, via its online store here. Author Credited to The Brown Brothers Permission (Reusing this file) Public Domain) http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules http://johnbatchelorshow.com/blog Twitter: @BatchelorShow

Best of 2017: The Great Migration to New York City. PART 2 of 2. @AnnieCorreal @NYT

“…In Etta Mae’s day, the magic of Harlem reached the South through newspapers, relatives’ letters and the radio, and in the 1940s, another wave of Southern migrants moved to New York, drawn by Cab Calloway and Duke Ellington as much as by the promise of factory jobs. “New York was the place to be,” Ms. Barnes said. While Ike was in the Pacific, Etta Mae joined her sister Mildred and her husband, along with her brother Charles, in Harlem, and the sisters found jobs pressing drapes at a factory in the garment district. “They were pressers,” Ms. Barnes said. “That was kind of the going job at the time.” When the war was over, Ike and Etta Mae were reunited in New York. On weekends, they would go dancing — at small clubs and at the blocklong Savoy Ballroom on Lenox Avenue, where thousands of couples did the jitterbug. From the time she was little, Ms. Barnes would take the train every year to visit the Taylors. “I was a Southern girl; I used to go every summer with my grandmother,” she said. “When I would see them dressed up, it was exciting. Like these were some movie stars or something.” Of her two aunts, Ms. Barnes said, Etta Mae was the serious one. “Mae thought she was the boss. She always thought she was smarter than everybody else. She was always saying, ‘Sister, you shouldn’t do that; Sister, you should.’” But she loved to dance, Ms. Barnes said. “And she could sing, too.”…”

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/nyregion/love-and-black-lives-in-pictures-found-on-a-brooklyn-street.html?_r=0