5 months ago: Beijing vs the end of the North Korea threat. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs.

Apr 21, 12:00 AM

AUTHOR.

(Photo:

English: Hundreds of thousands of Koreans fled south in mid-1950 after the North Korean army struck across the border. Rumors spread among U.S. troops that the refugee columns harbored North Korean infiltrators.

Date 1950

Source U.S. Defense Department

Author U.S. Defense Department)

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5 months ago: Beijing vs the end of the North Korea threat. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs.

BEIJING — A Chinese county along the border with North Korea is constructing refugee camps intended to house thousands of migrants fleeing a possible crisis on the Korean Peninsula, according to an internal document that appears to have been leaked from China’s main state-owned telecommunications company.

Three villages in Changbai County and two cities in the northeastern border province of Jilin, have been designated for the camps, according to the document from China Mobile. The document appeared last week on Weibo, a microblogging site.

The camps are an unusual, albeit tacit, admission by China that instability in North Korea is increasingly likely, and that refugees could swarm across the Tumen River, a narrow ribbon of water that divides the two countries.

For decades, Chinese policy on North Korea has centered on maintaining stability in a neighboring country known for its repression and volatility.

Despite international sanctions and condemnation, the North in recent months has intensified a program to test nuclear weapons and missiles, increasing the potential for internal instability or the chance of an attack by the United States.

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Lu Kang, China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman, told reporters on Monday that he was unaware of the plan for the refugee camps, but he did not deny their existence.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/11/world/asia/china-north-korea-border.html?_r=0