The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer by David Leavitt

Apr 29, 04:34 AM

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(Photo: Passport photo of Alan Turing at age 16)

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The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer by David Leavitt

https://www.amazon.com/Man-Who-Knew-Too-Much/dp/0393329097/ref=sr11?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1524976276&sr=1-1&keywords=david+leavitt+turing

To solve one of the great mathematical problems of his day, Alan Turing proposed an imaginary computer. Then, attempting to break a Nazi code during World War II, he successfully designed and built one, thus ensuring the Allied victory. Turing became a champion of artificial intelligence, but his work was cut short. As an openly gay man at a time when homosexuality was illegal in England, he was convicted and forced to undergo a humiliating "treatment" that may have led to his suicide.

With a novelist's sensitivity, David Leavitt portrays Turing in all his humanity―his eccentricities, his brilliance, his fatal candor―and elegantly explains his work and its implications.