Relentless attacking: "Born to Battle: 1 of 2: Grant and Forrest--Shiloh, Vicksburg, and Chattanooga" by Jack Hurst.

Jul 04, 12:53 AM

AUTHOR.

(Photo: Shiloh the second day. "Beauregard, unaware that he was now outnumbered, planned to continue the attack and drive Grant into the river. To his surprise, Union forces started moving forward in a massive counterattack at dawn. ")

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Relentless attacking: "Born to Battle: 1 of 2: Grant and Forrest--Shiloh, Vicksburg, and Chattanooga" by Jack Hurst.

Publishers Weekly “Making sophisticated use of archival and printed sources, Hurst maintains that the marginalization of Forrest, a blacksmith's son, by a Confederacy insisting on ‘blue-blood leadership' was ‘a chief cause of the Confederacy's death.' The Union, by contrast, made effective use of the equally lowborn and unpolished Grant. Both, Hurst asserts, exemplified the common men who did most of the war's dying. Both understood what soldiers could do in particular situations. And both were accustomed by peacetime hardship to the fears and anxieties of wartime command. The comparison…is original and provocative.”

American History “[A] well-told take on a great face-off.”

Kirkus Reviews “A lively narrative of the Civil War's Western theatre, too often overshadowed by the better known armies and battles in the East.... Hurst amply illustrates the misery visited upon Tennessee and Mississippi as the armies moved back and forth across the land, along with the backbiting, blunders and inflated egos that abounded in both armies.”

Ernest B. Furgurson, author of Chancellorsville 1863 and Not War But Murder: Cold Harbor 1864 “In a finely wrought battle narrative and character study, Jack Hurst shows how two men seemingly so different—one flamboyant and daring, the other solid and determined—became great soldiers by struggling not only against their enemies, but against their own inner demons.”