"Biddle is wounded fifteen minutes into the fight, and he will not leave the quarterdeck." "Give Me a Fast Ship: 3 of 6: "The Continental Navy and America's Revolution at Sea" by Tim McGrath.

Aug 19, 2018, 02:44 AM

AUTHOR.

(PHOTO: First Recognition of the American Flag by a Foreign Government, 14 February 1778 Painting in oils by Edward Moran, 1898. It depicts the Continental Navy Ship Ranger, commanded by Captain John Paul Jones, receiving the salute of the French fleet at Quiberon Bay, France, 14 February 1778. Earlier in the month, after receipt of news of the victory at Saratoga, France recognized the independence of the American colonies and signed a treaty of alliance with them. The original painting is in the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Annapolis, Maryland. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.)

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"Biddle is wounded fifteen minutes into the fight, and he will not leave the quarterdeck." "Give Me a Fast Ship:  3 of 6: "The Continental Navy and America's Revolution at Sea" by Tim McGrath.

https://www.amazon.com/Give-Fast-Ship-Continental-Revolution/dp/0451416112

“In Tim McGrath's Give Me a Fast Ship, early American naval literature has found a proud new flagship…. It is rare for a one-volume work to fill the sails of personalities and battles separated from the modern reader by nearly two centuries, but Give Me a Fast Ship pulls it off beautifully. His descriptions are vivid, his commanders three-dimensional, and he evinces a genuine love of the world of white sails and black powder. When Give Me a Fast Ship drops anchor, the reader returns from an adventure cruise with respect for the men who fought the Revolution at sea.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Give Me a Fast Ship is less a history of the birth of the U.S. Navy at the outbreak of the Revolution than it is a rousing collection of tales describing battles against the British, the Continental Congress and among rival captains…. Tim McGrath is a storyteller writ large… McGrath explains the details of 18th century navies with a deft pen and a decidedly nautical viewpoint. This is a delight to read.”—The Kansas City Star

“[McGrath’s] gripping descriptions of pursuit and combat at sea are the equal of any fiction, with the added virtue of being entirely true…. Solidly researched history presented with verve and gusto.”—Kirkus, starred review