“The overthrow of a head of state is usually much more than replacing one leader with another; it's a way of delegitimizing the constitutional process.” — Michael E Vlahos, Johns Hopkins @JHUWorldCrisis

Sep 08, 04:46 AM

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Photo: Refugees in South Sudan, one of many places where civil war has turned out disastrously

“The overthrow of a head of state is usually much more than replacing one leader with another; it's a way of delegitimizing the constitutional process.” — Michael E Vlahos, Johns Hopkins @JHUWorldCrisis

Here in the US these days, half the populati0n believes the president needs to be replaced while the other half cleaves strongly to keeping him seated till his elected term ends. The unseating of a president is a basis for destroying the entire old order that’s existed since the ratification of the Constitution. The process we're watching now would lead to a new situation in American life: two visions of what America is, with no possibility of resolution. What each side does to the other is “othering.” [In social science terms, similar to what’s called “reification” or “thingmatizing.”] What we’re seeing is not a deus ex machina, but total incapacitation. So far, impeachment has never led to the conviction of a president. We need to strive to avoid 1793 France, where the king was beheaded—and that haunted France for centuries. In our American national life, we rarely before been in such a bipolar situation, where fighting is preferred over other modes of resolution