Federal Lands: "Because the Westerners are totally committed to this idea that the lands are open, and they're available for recreation..." Robert Nelson @PERCTWEETS,

Sep 09, 03:11 AM

AUTHOR.

(Photo:Today #mypubliclandsroadtrip heads to a birdwatcher’s paradise - the Pariette Wetlands!

The largest wetland managed by BLM Utah, Pariette Wetlands is the oasis of the Uinta Basin. It is surrounded by vast miles of harsh, arid desert, yet Pariette Wetlands provide a green, marshy home for wildlife trying to survive in the desert.

The 25 man-made ponds at Pariette were created in 1972 to improve waterfowl production and provide seasonal habitat for other riparian species. Common Pariette birds include whooping cranes, peregrine falcons, bald eagles, waterfowl, egrets, and mallards. This area provides an observation point where birds and other wildlife can be viewed, so bring along binoculars and wildlife viewing guides.

Date 12 July 2015, 10:33

Source My Public Lands Roadtrip: Pariette Wetlands in Utah

Author Bureau of Land Management )

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Transferring Federal Lands to States:: "Because the Westerners are totally committed to this idea that the lands are open, and they're available for recreation..."  Robert Nelson @PERCTWEETS, 

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2017/01/17/can-western-states-afford-a-federal-land-transfer/allow-the-states-to-decide-whether-they-should-get-federal-lands

Lays out the case for Western states’ managing Federal lands; & what is to be done. "…Utah is unique among Western states in making such detailed information available, but Wyoming and New Mexico would surely benefit even much more, owing to the large increases in mineral revenues they would receive without having to share with the federal government, which would more than offset the additional cost of taking on new land management responsibilities. The final argument against federal land transfer (often more implicit than explicit) is that, rather than federal efficiency, federal “values” are superior and thus should trump state values. But this argument is paternalistic if not neo-colonial. Some might argue, however, that state political institutions are so flawed that they fail to represent the actual values of the citizens of western states themselves, requiring federal intervention to protect the West against itself. So why not hold a referendum in western states (those wishing to do so) on the question of whether the federal lands (minus certain lands particularly significant for the whole nation) should be transferred to the state? Let’s see at the ballot box if the majority of voters in the West prefer the imposition of national management and its values to what they think they would get from their own state political system…."