January 1919: "There's no autopsy. He has a real streak of suicide in the family..." TR's Last War: 3 of 3: Theodore Roosevelt, the Great War, and a Journey of Triumph and Tragedy by @DPietrusza

Oct 06, 03:30 AM

AUTHOR.

(Photo:Newspaper photo (digitally altered slightly to fix corners) Original caption: To the best of our knowledge this is the first photo be published of an airplane flying underneath Brooklyn Bridge. This remarkable and hazardous feat was accomplished one day last week by one of the army's giant Caproni planes from Mineola. Treacherous air currents and the fact that the Caproni is not designed to land on water made this thrilling stunt daring in the extreme.

Date 23 November 1919

Source LOC

Author New-York tribune

Licensing[edit]

Public domain

This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See this page for further explanation. )

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January 1919: "There's no autopsy. He has a real streak of suicide in the family..." TR's Last War: 3 of 3: Theodore Roosevelt, the Great War, and a Journey of Triumph and Tragedy by @DPietrusza

https://www.amazon.com/TRs-Last-War-Theodore-Roosevelt/dp/1493028871

An amazingly fresh approach to a much covered subject….

TR's Last War is a riveting new account of Theodore Roosevelt’s impassioned crusade for military preparedness as America fitfully stumbles into World War I, spectacularly punctuated by his unique tongue-lashings of the vacillating Woodrow Wilson, his rousing advocacy of a masculine, pro-Allied “Americanism,” a death-defying compulsion for personal front-line combat, a tentative rapprochement with GOP power brokers—and, yes, perhaps, even another presidential campaign. Roosevelt is a towering Greek god of war. But Greek gods begat Greek tragedies. His own entreaties to don the uniform are rebuffed, and he remains stateside. But his four sons fight “over there” with heartbreaking consequences: two are wounded; his youngest and most loved child dies in aerial combat. Yet, though grieving and weary, TR may yet surmount everything with one monumentally odds-defying last triumph. Poised at the very brink of a final return to the White House, death stills his indomitable spirit.

In his lively, witty, blow-by-blow style, David Pietrusza captures, through the lens of the Bull Moose, the 1916 presidential campaign, America’s entry into the Great War in 1917, Woodrow Wilson’s presidency, and the last years of one of American history’s greatest men, who said on his death bed at the age of sixty, “I promised myself that I would work up to the hilt until I was sixty, and I have done it. I have kept my promise….” Pietrusza not only transports readers with his dramatic portraits of TR, his hated rival Wilson, and politics in wild flux but also poignantly chronicles the horrific price a family pays in war.