Reawakening Wallops Island Spaceport. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com

Oct 21, 02:22 AM

AUTHOR.

Configuration

Description 

English: Aerial Photograph of Wallops Island.

Date 1 January 1982

Source Great Images in NASA Description

Author NASA

Permission

(Reusing this file) 

Public domain This file is in the public domain in the United States because it was solely created by NASA. NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted". (See Template:PD-USGov, NASA copyright policy page or JPL Image Use Policy.) NASA logo.svg

Dialog-warning.svg Warnings:

Use of NASA logos, insignia and emblems is restricted per U.S. law 14 CFR 1221.

The NASA website hosts a large number of images from the Soviet/Russian space agency, and other non-American space agencies. These are not necessarily in the public domain.

Materials based on Hubble Space Telescope data may be copyrighted if they are not explicitly produced by the STScI.[1] See also {{PD-Hubble}} and {{Cc-Hubble}}.

The SOHO (ESA & NASA) joint project implies that all materials created by its probe are copyrighted and require permission for commercial non-educational use. [2]

Images featured on the Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) web site may be copyrighted. [3]

The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) site has been known to host copyrighted content. Its photo gallery FAQ states that all of the images in the photo gallery are in the public domain "Unless otherwise noted."

 Shuttle.svg This image or video was catalogued by Goddard Space Flight Center of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Photo ID: GPN-2000-001326 AND Alternate ID: WALLOPS4. (Photo: )

http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact

http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules

Twitter: @BatchelorShow

Reawakening Wallops Island Spaceport. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com

https://behindtheblack.com/?s=rocket+lab

Capitalism in space: Rocket Lab has picked the spaceport at Wallops in Virginia as its first U.S. launch site.

The company is planning its first launch of Electron from U.S. soil and its Wallops facility for Quarter 3 of 2019, less than a year from today’s announcement. “We needed to get pad and support up quickly, and Wallops met the bill completely for what we needed to achieve in this time,” said Mr. Beck to NASASpaceflight.

Overall, the Wallops launch pad, known as Launch Complex 2 (LC-2), will be Rocket Lab’s second dedicated launch complex, will be capable of supporting monthly orbital launches, and is designed to serve U.S. government and commercial missions. The site will bring Rocket Lab’s global launch availability across two launch complexes to more than 130 missions per year.

It really does appear that once they successfully complete their next two launches in November and December, the company will be aiming to meet a launch cadence of at least one orbital launch per week.