Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization by Liel Leibovitz and Matthew Miller

Nov 08, 01:53 AM

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William Daniell's c. 1805 View of the Canton Factories: Until 1842, foreigners "from the Southern Sea" were required to live in Macao or the ships of the Pazhou ("Whampoa") anchorage; even bonded traders were restricted to the Thirteen Factories trading ghetto in Guangzhou (then romanized as "Canton"). Travel outside these areas was forbidden. Foreign women were permitted only on Macao.

William Daniell - http://www.nmm.ac.uk/collections/explore/object.cfm?ID=ZBA1291

Canton City (Guangzhou) — with the Pearl River and the several of the Thirteen Factories of the Europeans.

Public Domain

File:View of Canton factories 2.jpg

Created: 1805–10 )

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Fortunate Sons: The 120 Chinese Boys Who Came to America, Went to School, and Revolutionized an Ancient Civilization by Liel Leibovitz and Matthew Miller

https://www.amazon.com/Fortunate-Sons-Chinese-Revolutionized-Civilization-ebook/dp/B004HW6A7O/ref=sr1fkmr0_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1541641609&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=leibowitz+miller+120+boys

The epic story of the American-educated boys who changed China forever.

At the twilight of the nineteenth century, China sent a detachment of boys to America in order to learn the ways of the West, modernize the antiquated empire, and defend it from foreigners invading its shores. After spending a decade in New England’s finest schools, the boys re-turned home, driven by a pioneering spirit of progress and reform. Their lives in America influenced not only their thinking but also their nation’s endeavor to become a contemporary world power, an endeavor that resonates powerfully today.

Drawing on diaries, letters, and other first-person accounts, Fortunate Sons tells a remarkable tale, weaving together the dramas of personal lives with the momentous thrust of a nation reborn. Shedding light on a crucial yet largely unknown period in China’s history, Fortunate Sons provides insight into the issues concerning that nation today, from its struggle toward economic supremacy to its fraught relationship with the United States. 40 black-and-white illustrations