Heir to the Empire City: 2 of 2: New York and the Making of Theodore Roosevelt by Edward P. Kohn (Author)

Nov 10, 03:14 AM

AUTHOR.

(Photo:

Hughson Hawley (1850–1936) Blue pencil.svg wikidata:Q18508306

Title 

English: Pennsylvania Railroad Station, New York city : Seventh Avenue and Thirty-Second Street, looking towards Long Island

Description 

English: Pennsylvania Railroad Station, New York city : Seventh Avenue and Thirty-Second Street, looking towards Long Island

Date 1910

Dimensions Height: 70 cm (27.5 ″); Width: 133 cm (52.3 ″)

References Library of Congress Bookmark: https://www.loc.gov/item/2011593041/

Source/Photographer 

US-LibraryOfCongress-BookLogo.svg This image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Geography & Map Division under the digital ID g3804n.ct002194.

This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information.

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Licensing[edit]

Public domain 

This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 70 years or less.

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Heir to the Empire City: 2 of 2: New York and the Making of Theodore Roosevelt by Edward P. Kohn (Author)

Twitter: @BatchelorShow

https://www.amazon.com/Heir-Empire-City-Theodore-Roosevelt/dp/0465024297

Theodore Roosevelt is best remembered as America's prototypical "cowboy" president-a Rough Rider who derived his political wisdom from a youth spent in the untamed American West. But while the great outdoors certainly shaped Roosevelt's identity, historian Edward P. Kohn argues that it was his hometown of New York that made him the progressive president we celebrate today. During his early political career, Roosevelt took on local Republican factions and Tammany Hall Democrats alike, proving his commitment to reform at all costs. He combated the city's rampant corruption, and helped to guide New York through the perils of rabid urbanization and the challenges of accommodating an influx of immigrants-experiences that would serve him well as president of the United States.

A riveting account of a man and a city on the brink of greatness, Heir to the Empire City reveals that Roosevelt's true education took place not in the West but on the mean streets of nineteenth-century New York.