Dragnet Nation: 2 of 2: A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance by Julia Angwin (Author)

Nov 11, 12:34 AM

AUTHOR.

(Photo:The Library of Congress Follow

Police machine gun (LOC) 

Bain News Service,, publisher.

Police machine gun

[between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920]

1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.

Notes:

Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards.

Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Format: Glass negatives.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.26816

Call Number: LC-B2- 4587-16 )

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Dragnet Nation: 2 of 2:  A Quest for Privacy, Security, and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance by Julia Angwin (Author)

https://www.amazon.com/Dragnet-Nation-Security-Relentless-Surveillance/dp/0805098070

An inside look at who's watching you, what they know and why it matters. We are being watched.

We see online ads from websites we've visited, long after we've moved on to other interests. Our smartphones and cars transmit our location, enabling us to know what's in the neighborhood but also enabling others to track us. And the federal government, we recently learned, has been conducting a massive data-gathering surveillance operation across the Internet and on our phone lines.

In Dragnet Nation, award-winning investigative journalist Julia Angwin reports from the front lines of America's surveillance economy, offering a revelatory and unsettling look at how the government, private companies, and even criminals use technology to indiscriminately sweep up vast amounts of our personal data. In a world where we can be watched in our own homes, where we can no longer keep secrets, and where we can be impersonated, financially manipulated, or even placed in a police lineup, Angwin argues that the greatest long-term danger is that we start to internalize the surveillance and censor our words and thoughts, until we lose the very freedom that makes us unique individuals. Appalled at such a prospect, Angwin conducts a series of experiments to try to protect herself, ranging from quitting Google to carrying a "burner" phone, showing how difficult it is for an average citizen to resist the dragnets' reach.

Her book is a cautionary tale for all of us, with profound implications for our values, our society, and our very selves.