A Wicked War: 1 of 2: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico by Amy S. Greenberg (Author)

Nov 11, 01:41 AM

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Image from page 133 of "Biologia Centrali-Americana, or, Contributions to the knowledge of the fauna and flora of Mexico and Central America" (1889) 

Identifier: biologiacentrali01maud

Title: Biologia Centrali-Americana, or, Contributions to the knowledge of the fauna and flora of Mexico and Central America

Year: 1889 (1880s)

Authors: Maudslay, Alfred Percival, 1850-1931 Goodman, J. T Godman, Frederick Du Cane, 1834-1919 Salvin, Osbert, 1835-1898 Greve, W., lithographer Griggs, William, 1832-1911 Hunter, Ada Purkiss, W., lithographer Shawe, W Sweet, H. N. (Henry N.)

Subjects: Mayas Indians of Mexico Indians of Central America Mayas Indians of Mexico Indians of Central America Inscriptions, Mayan Maya calendar

Publisher: London : Published for the editors by R.H. Porter ... and Dulau & Co.

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Institution Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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dation-mounds, for the whole group of ruined buildings has long been treatedas a quarry by the people of Santa Cruz. There can be no doubt that this group ofmounds represents the guard-house or Castle of Eesguardo; but it is quite clear fromthe plan that the buildings were of the same nature as those found throughout thecountry, and they stand grouped together in the usual manner. The position theyoccupy is a naturally strong one, and would offer great facilities for defence, but thereis nothing especially characteristic of a fortress about the buildings themselves. After leaving this hill a walk of about two hundred yards brings one to the edge ofthe barranca and to the narrow natural causeway by which alone the city orstronghold of Utatlan could be approached. On crossing this narrow bridge one findsoneself on a fairly level space of ground about eighteen acres in extent, with almostprecipitous sides, over which one can look down to the bottom of the barranca fourhundred feet below.

Text Appearing After Image:

j Nearly the whole area affords some trace of ruined buildings, but almost all thestonework has been stripped from the foundations, and the buildings which stood onthem have altogether disappeared. Stephens, who visited the ruins in 1840, gives thefollowing account of the principal temple:—:The most important part remaining ofthese ruins is that which appears in the engraving, and which is called El Sacrifica-torio, or the place of sacrifice. It is a quadrangular stone structure, sixty-six feet oneach side at the base, and rising in a pyramidal form to a height, in its presentcondition, of thirty-three feet. On three sides there is a range of steps in the middle,each step seventeen inches high, and but eight inches on the upper surface, whichmakes the range so steep that in descending some caution is necessary. At the cornersare four buttresses of cut stone, diminishing in size from the line of the square, and UTATLAN AND IXIMCHfi. 37 apparently intended to support the str

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A Wicked War: 1 of 2: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico by Amy S. Greenberg (Author)

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