@lizpeek, @elizabeth_peek: Did the Xi and Trump talk in Buenos Aires lead to the end of piracy by China of US intellectual property? The amount China has stolen to date constitutes “the largest transfer of wealth in history.”

Dec 05, 05:23 AM

Photo: President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump pose for the G20 “Family Photo” with fellow G20 leaders and their spouses Friday evening, Nov. 30, 2018, at the Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Official White House Photo by Andrea Hanks)

Permissions: Public domain. Taken on November 30, 2018  

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Liz Peek, Fox News and columnist for The Hill, in re: Did the Buenos Aires discussion between Xi and Trump lead to the end of piracy by China of US intellectual property? The amount stolen to date constitutes “the largest transfer of wealth in history.” That’s certainly the goal of the Trump Adm; however, Xi needs to [maintain face]. Xi has been championing free trade in speeches, presenting himself as a world leader in that and, oddly, castigating the US as anti-free trade. The miracle of the people of China extends back to the Adm of George H W Bush. . . . 

Larry Kudlow is quoted in Reuters; The Chinese, by eliminating the car, ag and energy commodities tariff, will provide a litmus test. It's my measure that that talk in BA is the beginning of the end of the astounding piracy. Agree; and no one has ever told the American people [the truth] about the massive theft, for which I fault our large corporations, who wanted to do business in China and make fortunes. In the event, they found that China has no rule of law, steals openly at incomprehensibly large scale, and can (and will) take over any foreign firm it chooses to.

Xi was unwilling to tell the Chinese people the results of the Buenos Aires talks, so they have no idea what transpired. Larry Kudlow said in plain American: No recession in sight. Why are our journalistic colleagues still ardently looking for a recession? True that the yield curve flattened, but no other real sign of any such thing.