Japan 1941: 3 of 4: Countdown to Infamy by Eri Hotta (Author)

Dec 10, 2018, 04:03 AM

AUTHOR.

(Photo:

日本語: 1939年(昭和14年)当時の日暮里駅。京成電車のりばが見える。常磐線の蒸気機関車牽引列車は夕方の数本は日暮里駅に停車したが、昼間はホームの中線が閉鎖されていて不思議な光景だったという。戦前

Date 1939

Source 

English: Japan Railfan Magazine(Tetsudō Fan: Japanese), Page37, No.148, KOYUSHA CO.LTD.,1973-8

日本語: 鉄道ファン1973年8月号(No.148)P37

Author Sasaki Kikyou/佐々木桔梗

Licensing[edit]

Public domain This photograph is in the public domain in Japan because its copyright has expired according to Article 23 of the 1899 Copyright Act of Japan (English translation) and Article 2 of Supplemental Provisions of Copyright Act of 1970. This is when the photograph meets one of the following conditions:

It was published before January 1, 1957.

It was photographed before January 1, 1947.

It is also in the public domain in the United States because its copyright in Japan expired by 1970 and was not restored by the Uruguay Round Agreements Act. )

http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact

http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules

Twitter: @BatchelorShow

Japan 1941: 3 of 4: Countdown to Infamy by Eri Hotta (Author)

https://www.amazon.com/Japan-1941-Countdown-Eri-Hotta/dp/0307739740

 Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of the Year

A groundbreaking history that considers the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective and is certain to revolutionize how we think of the war in the Pacific.

When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose. In a groundbreaking history that considers Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective, certain to revolutionize how we think of the war in the Pacific, Eri Hotta poses essential questions overlooked for the last seventy years: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens in harm's way? Why did they make a decision that was doomed from the start? Introducing us to the doubters, bluffers, and schemers who led their nation into this conflagration, Hotta brilliantly shows us a hidden Japan—eager to avoid war but fraught with tensions with the West, deluded by reckless militarism, tempted by the gambler’s dream of scoring the biggest win against impossible odds and nearly escaping disaster before it finally proved inevitable.