Global warming in the Cancer of Cancer. 1 of 2: Kenneth J. Feeley. @fairchildgarden 1International Center for Tropical Botany, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University,

Feb 12, 02:11 AM

Photo:

Internet Archive Book Images Follow

Image from page 348 of "Pacific shores from Panama" (1913) 

Identifier: pacificshoresfro00peix

Title: Pacific shores from Panama

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Peixotto, Ernest Clifford, 1869-1940

Subjects: Pacific Coast (South America) -- Description and travel Latin America -- Description and travel Peru -- Description and travel

Publisher: New York : C. Scribner's sons

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:

. Even the sunset, as we returned to the ship,was suflSciently lurid and full of colour to meet therequirements of the occasion, and as we stood outfor the open sea it was with deep regret that we saidgood-bye to the heat and discomfort, the glamourand charm, of the southern seas. Never shall I forget the romance of those nights atsea—the long talks with our captain up under thebridge, his lines from Kiphngs Seven Seas, thestars that twinkled their thousand eyes overhead,and the great calm Pacific that stretched to infinity,its broad bosom faintly heaving in its slumberousbreathing. After leaving San Bias we cut across the mouth ofthe Gulf of California, and toward sundown roundedthe southern extremity of Cape St. Lucas. That [282] THE ISTHMUS TO THE GOLDEN GATE night we crossed the tropic of Cancer. The SouthernCross, that had so long guided us, disappeared fromthe firmament, the North Star stood high in theheavens, and in the morning when we arose a brac-ing north wind greeted us.

Text Appearing After Image:

Loading Barges, San Bias The officers appeared dressed in navy blue insteadof the white of the tropics. Activity and energydeveloped in the crew. Even the passengers awokefrom their drowsiness, threw off the lethargy of thesteamer-chairs, and took long walks forward and aft.Lower California unrolled its naked headlands, thegreat bluffs of Magdalena Bay arose along the sea.Sometimes the coast was low and sandy; sometimes [283] PACIFIC SHORES FROM PANAMA table-lands stretched flat for miles, as if their tops hadbeen lopped off by giant machetes; sometimes highand wicked cliffs lifted their walls along the shore,scarred and seamed, with the surf pounding alongtheir feet. Many a good ship has foundered on thiswild coast, with no lights, even to-day, to guide themin the night, with no siren to warn them in the fog,their ribs mouldering along the treacherous rock-bound shore. Beyond Cape San Rocco and Cedro Island wepassed the deep curve of Viscainos Bay, and followedthe course of that intr

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

2,964

views

0

faves

0

comments

Taken circa 1913

 No known copyright restrictions

Global warming in the Cancer of Cancer. 1 of 2: Kenneth J. Feeley. @fairchildgarden 1International Center for Tropical Botany, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, 

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/351/6280/1392.full  

“Mountain passes are higher in the tropics,” or, the Prospects of Tropical Climate Change. Kenneth J. Feeley. @fairchildgarden Thermal trouble in the tropics. Timothy M. Perez1,2, James T. Stroud1,2, Kenneth J. Feeley1,2 1International Center for Tropical Botany, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA 2Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Coral Gables, FL 33156, USA. Science 25 Mar 2016: Vol. 351, Issue 6280, pp. 1392-1393 DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf3343 “Summary: Early Victorian naturalists marveled at the profusion of diversity they encountered as they traveled from temperat...