Flight of the Eagle: 7 of 8: The Grand Strategies That Brought America from Colonial Dependence to World Leadership Kindle Edition by Conrad Black (Author)

Feb 13, 03:52 AM

Photo:

Coolidge inspects militia in Boston police strike

http://www.massmoments.org/moment.cfm?mid=237 (original photo is at the Boston Public Library)

Governor Calvin Coolidge inspects the militia during the Boston Police Strike of 1919

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File:Coolidge inspects militia.jpg

Created: 31 December 1918

Flight of the Eagle: 7 of 8: The Grand Strategies That Brought America from Colonial Dependence to World Leadership Kindle Edition by Conrad Black (Author)

https://www.amazon.com/Flight-Eagle-Strategies-Dependence-Leadership-ebook/dp/B00N01VM1C/ref=tmmkinswatch0?encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Like an eagle, American colonists ascended from the gulley of British dependence to the position of sovereign world power in a period of merely two centuries. Seizing territory in Canada and representation in Britain; expelling the French, and even their British forefathers, American leaders George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson paved their nation’s way to independence. With the first buds of public relation techniques—of communication, dramatization, and propaganda—America flourished into a vision of freedom, of enterprise, and of unalienable human rights.

In Flight of the Eagle, Conrad Black provides a perspective on American history that is unprecedented. Through his analysis of the strategic development of the United States from 1754-1992, Black describes nine “phases” of the strategic rise of the nation, in which it progressed through grave challenges, civil and foreign wars, and secured a place for itself under the title of “Superpower.” Black discredits prevailing notions that our unrivaled status is the product of good geography, demographics, and good luck. Instead, he reveals and analyzes the specific strategic decisions of great statesmen through the ages that transformed the world as we know it and established America’s place in it.