Chloe Gibbs - How Out-of-School Time is Shaping Children's Educational Trajectories

Nov 05, 2017, 12:00 AM

Elementary school students in the U.S. spend less than 25 percent of their waking hours in school over the course of a year. Coupled with the large influence of outside-of-school factors in shaping children's educational trajectories, researchers and policymakers alike are exploring and testing innovative interventions that leverage time, settings, and connections beyond the traditional school day to improve educational outcomes. Dr. Gibbs and The Lab's Sam Quinney discuss findings from the latest research on engaging and informing parents, extending the school day, and coordinating across different social-service systems, and discuss new ideas on the forefront of expanding our education policy tools with a particular focus on early childhood. About our guest: Chloe Gibbs is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame where she is also a faculty affiliate of the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities and the Institute for Educational Initiatives. Pr...

Elementary school students in the U.S. spend less than 25 percent of their waking hours in school over the course of a year. Coupled with the large influence of outside-of-school factors in shaping children's educational trajectories, researchers and policymakers alike are exploring and testing innovative interventions that leverage time, settings, and connections beyond the traditional school day to improve educational outcomes. Dr. Gibbs and The Lab's Sam Quinney discuss findings from the latest research on engaging and informing parents, extending the school day, and coordinating across different social-service systems, and discuss new ideas on the forefront of expanding our education policy tools with a particular focus on early childhood. About our guest: Chloe Gibbs is an assistant professor of economics at the University of Notre Dame where she is also a faculty affiliate of the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities and the Institute for Educational Initiatives. Professor Gibbs is interested in measuring the effects, both intended and unintended, of policies and programs targeted at disadvantaged children and families. Her recent research includes analyzing the impact of full-day kindergarten participation on cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes, exploring the “fade out” of early childhood intervention effects, and investigating the intergenerational transmission of Head Start effects. Her research has been cited by Education Week, TIME, The Washington Post, and the President’s Council of Economic Advisors, and her work is currently supported by funding from the National Academy of Education, Spencer Foundation, Russell Sage Foundation, and the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. She completed her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy.