50 Years After: 1 of 2: Can the Cold War's Outer Space Treaty, 1967, be stretched to be useful another 50 years? @spacelawpolicy Michael Listner, SpaceLawSolutions.com

Jul 22, 01:42 AM
Photo: English: An illustration from the novel "From the Earth to the Moon" by Jules Verne drawn by Henri de Montaut.Polski: Ilustracja powieści Juliusza Verne'a "Z Ziemi na Księżyc" autorstwa Henri de Montauta.Français : "De la Terre à la Lune", Henri de Montaut. | This file was uploaded with Commonist.Français : L’arrivée du projectile à Stone’s-Hill
Date | 31 July 1868
Source | http://jv.gilead.org.il/rpaul/De%20la%20terre%20%C3%A0%20la%20lune/
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50 Years After: 1 of 2: Can the Cold War's Outer Space Treaty, 1967, be stretched to be useful another 50 years? @spacelawpolicy Michael Listner, SpaceLawSolutions.com

"The Outer Space Treaty represents the basic legal framework of international space law. Among its principles, it bars states party to the treaty from placing weapons of mass destruction in orbit of Earth, installing them on the Moon or any other celestial body, or otherwise stationing them in outer space. It exclusively limits the use of the Moon and other celestial bodies to peaceful purposes and expressly prohibits their use for testing weapons of any kind, conducting military maneuvers, or establishing military bases, installations, and fortifications (Article IV). However, the Treaty does not prohibit the placement of conventional weapons in orbit and thus some highly destructive attack strategies such as kinetic bombardment are still potentially allowable. The treaty also states that the exploration of outer space shall be done to benefit all countries and that space shall be free for exploration and use by all the States.

The treaty explicitly forbids any government from claiming a celestial resource such as the Moon or a planet.[3] Article II of the Treaty states that "outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means". However, the State that launches a space object retains jurisdiction and control over that object.[4] The State is also liable for damages caused by their space object.[5]"


"Pragmatic Solutions to Address the Challenges of Developing the Final Frontier.

As outer space development becomes more prolific so do the legal and policy issues that surround its use and exploitation. In the realm of new space, understanding the issues and their effect on both government and private sector space activities is critical...."