The Crusade Years, 1933–1955: 1 of 4: Herbert Hoover's Lost Memoir of the New Deal Era and Its Aftermath (Hoover Institution Press Publication (Hardcover)) Hardcover – December 1, 2013. by George H. Nash (Editor)

Nov 27, 2019, 12:26 AM
Photo: English: Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Herbert Hoover in convertible automobile on way to U.S. Capitol for Roosevelt's inauguration, March 4, 1933
Date4 March 1933
Source
This image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division
under the digital ID ppmsc.02895.
This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information.
________________________________

العربية | беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎ | čeština | Deutsch | English | español | فارسی | suomi | français | עברית | magyar | italiano | lietuvių | македонски | മലയാളം | Nederlands | polski | português | português do Brasil | русский | sicilianu | slovenčina | slovenščina | Türkçe | українська | 中文 | 中文(简体)‎ | 中文(繁體)‎ | +/−

AuthorPhotograph from Architect of the Capitol, AOC no. 18241
http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact
http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules
Twitter: @BatchelorShow



The Crusade Years, 1933–1955: 1 of 4: Herbert Hoover's Lost Memoir of the New Deal Era and Its Aftermath (Hoover Institution Press Publication (Hardcover)) Hardcover – December 1, 2013.  by George H. Nash  (Editor)


https://www.amazon.com/Crusade-Years-1933-1955-Institution/dp/0817916741/ref=sr_1_6?keywords=George+Nash+Hoover&qid=1574811407&s=audible&sr=8-6


Covering an eventful period in Herbert Hoover’s career—and, more specifically, his life as a political pugilist from 1933 to 1955—this previously unknown memoir was composed and revised by the 31st president during the 1940s and 1950s—and then, surprisingly, set aside. This work recounts Hoover’s family life after March 4, 1933, his myriad philanthropic interests, and, most of all, his unrelenting “crusade against collectivism” in American life. Aside from its often feisty account of Hoover’s political activities during the Roosevelt and Truman eras, and its window on Hoover’s private life and campaigns for good causes, The Crusade Years invites readers to reflect on the factors that made his extraordinarily fruitful postpresidential years possible. The pages of this memoir recount the story of Hoover’s later life, his abiding political philosophy, and his vision of the nation that gave him the opportunity for service. This is, in short, a remarkable saga told in the former president’s own words and in his own way that will appeal as much to professional historians and political scientists as it will lay readers interested in history.