The Master Switch: 1 of 2: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires Audible Audiobook – Unabridged Tim Wu (Author), Marc Vietor (Narrator), Audible Studios (Publisher)

Feb 10, 12:00 AM
Photo: Partial map of the Internet, with nodes representing IP addresses
http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/contact
http://JohnBatchelorShow.com/schedules
Twitter: @BatchelorShow

The Master Switch: 1 of 2:  The Rise and Fall of Information Empires  Audible Audiobook – Unabridged Tim Wu (Author), Marc Vietor (Narrator), Audible Studios (Publisher)


https://www.amazon.com/Master-Switch-Rise-Information-Empires-dp-B004ADM0AG/dp/B004ADM0AG/ref=mt_audio_download?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=1581256412

A secret history of the industrial wars behind the rise and fall of the 20th century's great information empires - Hollywood, the broadcast networks, and AT&T - asking one big question: Could history repeat itself, with one giant entity taking control of American information? 

Most consider the Internet Age to be a moment of unprecedented freedom in communications and culture. But as Tim Wu shows, each major new medium, from telephone to cable, arrived on a similar wave of idealistic optimism only to become, eventually, the object of industrial consolidation profoundly affecting how Americans communicate. Every once-free and open technology was in time centralized and closed, a huge corporate power taking control of the master switch. Today, as a similar struggle looms over the Internet, increasingly the pipeline of all other media, the stakes have never been higher. To be decided: who gets heard, and what kind of country we live in. Part industrial exposé, part meditation on the nature of freedom of expression, part battle cry to save the Internet's best features, The Master Switch brings to light a crucial drama rife with indelible characters and stories, heretofore played out over decades in the shadows of our national life.
..
Permissions:
Partial map of the Internet based on the January 15, 2005 data found on opte.org. Each line is drawn between two nodes, representing two IP addresses. The length of the lines are indicative of the delay between those two nodes. This graph represents less than 30% of the Class C networks reachable by the data collection program in early 2005. Lines are color-coded according to their corresponding RFC 1918 allocation as follows:Dark blue: net, ca, usGreen: com, orgRed: mil, gov, eduYellow: jp, cn, tw, au, deMagenta: uk, it, pl, frGold: br, kr, nlWhite: unknown
Date | Original upload: December 1, 2006
Source | Originally from the English Wikipedia; description page is/was here.
Author | The Opte Project
Permission This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic license. |
You are free:to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the workto remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions:attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.