"Both history and Keynesian-influenced economic theory teach that . . ." @VerodeRugy @Marcatus

Jun 04, 01:50 AM
Photo: In 1921, Keynes wrote that he had fallen "very much in love" with Lydia Lopokova, a well-known Russian ballerina and one of the stars of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes.

In 1921, Keynes wrote that he had fallen "very much in love" with Lydia Lopokova, a well-known Russian ballerina and one of the stars of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes.[160] In the early years of his courtship, he maintained an affair with a younger man, Sebastian Sprott, in tandem with Lopokova, but eventually chose Lopokova exclusively. They were married in 1925, with Keynes's former lover Duncan Grant as best man."What a marriage of beauty and brains, the fair Lopokova and John Maynard Keynes" was said at the time. Keynes later commented to Strachey that beauty and intelligence were rarely found in the same person, and that only in Duncan Grant had he found the combination. The union was happy, with biographer Peter Clarke writing that the marriage gave Keynes "a new focus, a new emotional stability and a sheer delight of which he never wearied".  The couple hoped to have children but this did not happen.




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Keynes 2021: "Both history and Keynesian-influenced economic theory teach that . . ." @VerodeRugy @Marcatus


https://www.mercatus.org/publications/government-spending/keynesian-stimulus-virtuous-semicircle