Sculpting Lives: Barbara Hepworth

Mar 24, 07:00 AM

Barbara Hepworth was born in Wakefield, West Yorkshire in 1903. By the time of her 1975 death, she had become one of the most important artists of the century, creating a poignant and innovative sculptural language.

“Hepworth... didn’t see herself as a feminist at all and didn’t see herself as ‘a pioneering woman’, she just felt she was a pioneering sculptor.” Stephen Feeke, curator and writer. 

Barbara Hepworth was born in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, in 1903. By the time of her death in 1975, she had become one of the most important artists of the century, creating a poignant and innovative sculptural language. She is extremely unusual for a woman artist in that she has two museums named after her. 

Although a lot has been written about Hepworth, there is still a great deal to find out – there is a mystique and there are assumptions made about her. In this episode, we challenge those ideas, go to the places she lived and worked, and explore why she remains such a powerful influence on artists today.
 
 “A normal person from Wakefield, a remarkable artist but a remarkable woman.” Eleanor Clayton, Curator, The Hepworth Wakefield. 

With AMAZING contributions from:

·      Eleanor Clayton, Curator, The Hepworth Wakefield
·      Sara Matson, Curator, Tate St Ives
·      Stephen Feeke, Curator and Writer
·      Clare Lilley, Director of Programme, Yorkshire Sculpture Park

In the episode, we visit these incredible places associated with Hepworth's career and legacy:
The Hepworth, Wakefield
Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden (Tate), St Ives
Yorkshire Sculpture Park

For the art works discussed in this episode and more images related to our research on Hepworth, visit @sculptinglives on Instagram

Image: Dame Barbara Hepworth, Corymb, 1959, bronze, 33.7 x 34.5 x 25.6 cm. Collection Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden, Tate St Ives (T12281). © Bowness